[an error occurred while processing this directive] Celebrating Five Years of Pushing Comix Forward [an error occurred while processing this directive] [an error occurred while processing this directive] [an error occurred while processing this directive] [an error occurred while processing this directive] Chocolate and French Fries
Written by Carlos Trillo
Drawn by Juan Bobillo
Published by SAF Comics; $12.95 USD

I didn’t grow up in a very large family, but I did have a very close knit one. My cousins always felt more like brothers and sisters than cousins, and when my Dad remarried he brought two more sisters into the fold. On the weekends we spent with my Dad there were six of us, and if we wound up at my Grandmothers with my cousins, there were eight. Since my family never got into the “9-5” work routine, we’d often be more or less dumped off by the adults for a number of hours while they worked. So, I know a little about how the brothers in apartment 6C feel.

A group of kids, left alone to figure out the why’s and what for’s of life. At first it read like a more fantastic Home Alone. But, by the time the brothers begin concocting theories about their parents’ sudden disappearance (alien abduction is the one they stick with), the book solidifies itself as something truly unique. A mystery wrapped in fantasy wrapped in the every day lives of a group of children.

And while it is about children, it’s not really a book tailored to children. It deals with very adult themes, most especially responsibility. The responsibility we have to those around us, the people we love, to help them when we are called upon; to work together for a common goal. These children do that. They do the things the adults in their lives are unable to do. And they succeed at it.

Of course, situations like “We need money” are handled with a kind of comical turn. They simply go down to the ATM, insert a card, mash the buttons randomly and wait for it to come. Not something adults can do, but it’s a valuable lesson for the kids regardless. Sometimes you have to work a little to get the things you think you need.

So, think of it as a children’s book for adults. For the adults who always thought (and maybe still do) that they never really needed their parents anyway, they could get along just fine without them. A beautiful, hilarious and heartbreaking look at life. A book that reminds you not what it means to be a kid, but an independent person, finally free of everything you knew was holding you back.

-- Logan Polk

Send review copies to:
Logan Polk
5812 Glenlake Ct.
Columbus Ga 31909

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